Cleaning And Disinfecting Your Home

Cleaning And Disinfecting Your Home
Cleaning And Disinfecting Your Home

This month’s blog comes straight from the CDC, which we thought would be helpful during these uncertain times. Do you know the difference between cleaning and disinfecting? This is a good time to reevaluate the steps we take to stay safe and healthy.

CDC

How to clean and disinfect

Clean
Clean

  Wear reusable or disposable gloves for routine cleaning and disinfection.
  Clean surfaces using soap and water, then use disinfectant.
  Cleaning with soap and water reduces number of germs, dirt and impurities on the surface. Disinfecting kills germs on surfaces.
  Practice routine cleaning of frequently touched surfaces. High touch surfaces include:
      Tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, sinks, etc.

Disinfect
Disinfect

  Recommend proper use of disinfectants, as listed below.

Many products recommend:

  Keeping surface wet for a period of time (see product label)
  Precautions such as wearing gloves and making sure you have good ventilation during use of the product

Always read and follow the directions on the label to ensure safe and effective use.

  Wear skin protection and consider eye protection for potential splash hazards
  Ensure adequate ventilation
  Use no more than the amount recommended on the label
  Use water at room temperature for dilution (unless stated otherwise on the label)
  Avoid mixing chemical products
  Label diluted cleaning solutions
  Store and use chemicals out of the reach of children and pets

You should never eat, drink, breathe or inject these products into your body or apply directly to your skin as they can cause serious harm. Do not wipe or bathe pets with these products or any other products that are not approved for animal use.

Diluted household bleach solutions may also be used if appropriate for the surface.

      Check the label to see if your bleach is intended for disinfection and has a sodium hypochlorite concentration of 5%–6%. Ensure the product is not past its expiration date. Some bleaches, such as those designed for safe use on colored clothing or for whitening, may not be suitable for disinfection.

      Unexpired household bleach will be effective against coronaviruses when properly diluted.
Follow manufacturer’s instructions for application and proper ventilation. Never mix household bleach with ammonia or any other cleanser. Leave solution on the surface for at least 1 minute.

  To make a bleach solution, mix:
      5 tablespoons (1/3rd cup) bleach per gallon of room temperature water
OR
  4 teaspoons bleach per quart of room temperature water
  Bleach solutions will be effective for disinfection up to 24 hours.
  Alcohol solutions with at least 70% alcohol may also be used.

Soft surfaces

For soft surfaces such as carpeted floor, rugs, and drapes.

  Clean the surface using soap and water or with cleaners appropriate for use on these surfaces.
  Launder items (if possible) according to the manufacturer’s instructions.Use the warmest appropriate water setting and dry items completely.
OR
  Disinfect with an EPA-registered household disinfectant. Use disinfectants that meet the EPA’s criteria for use against COVID-19.
  Vacuum as usual.

Electronics

For electronics, such as tablets, touch screens, keyboards, and remote controls.
 Consider putting a wipeable cover on electronics.
 Follow manufacturer’s instruction for cleaning and disinfecting.
      If no guidance, use alcohol-based wipes or sprays containing at least 70% alcohol. Dry surface thoroughly.

Laundry

For clothing, towels, linens and other items.

  Launder items according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Use the warmest appropriate water setting and dry items completely.
  Wear disposable gloves when handling dirty laundry from a person who is sick.
  Dirty laundry from a person who is sick can be washed with other people’s items.
  Do not shake dirty laundry.
  Clean and disinfect clothes hampers according to guidance above for surfaces.
  Remove gloves, and wash hands right away.

Clean hands often
Clean hands often

  Key times to clean hands
      Immediately after removing gloves and after contact with a person who is sick.
      After blowing one’s nose, coughing, or sneezing
      After using the restroom
      Before eating or preparing food
      After contact with animals or pets
      Before and after providing routine care for another person who needs assistance (e.g. a child)

  Wash your hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds.
  Hand sanitizer: If soap and water are not readily available and hands are not visibly dirty, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. However, if hands are visibly dirty, always wash hands with soap and water.

Always read and follow the directions on the label to ensure safe and effective use.

  Keep hand sanitizers away from fire or flame
  For children under six years of age, hand sanitizer should be used with adult supervision
  Always store hand sanitizer out of reach of children and pets
  Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

When someone is sick

Bedroom and bathroom
Bedroom and bathroom

Keep separate bedroom and bathroom for a person who is sick (if possible).

  The person who is sick should stay separated from other people in the home (as much as possible).

  If you have a separate bedroom and bathroom: Wear disposable gloves and only clean the area around the person who is sick when needed, such as when the area is soiled. This will help limit your contact with the person who is sick.

      Caregivers can provide personal cleaning supplies to the person who is sick (if appropriate). Supplies include tissues, paper towels, cleaners, and disinfectants. If they feel up to it, the person who is sick can clean their own space.

  If shared bathroom: The person who is sick should clean and disinfect after each use. If this is not possible, the caregiver should wait as long as possible before cleaning and disinfecting.

Food

  Stay separated: The person who is sick should eat (or be fed) in their room if possible.

  Wash dishes and utensils using disposable gloves and hot water: Handle any used dishes, cups/glasses, or silverware with gloves. Wash them with soap and hot water or in a dishwasher.

  Clean hands after taking off gloves or handling used items.

Trash
Trash

  Dedicated, lined trash can: If possible, dedicate a lined trash can for the person who is sick. Use disposable gloves when removing garbage bags, and handling and disposing of trash. Wash hands afterwards.

Jacobs Gardner is here to provide you with all the cleaning and disinfectant supplies you need to stay healthy. Call us today for fast, free delivery.

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7 Environmentally Friendly Office Products to Help Your Office Go Green

7 Environmentally Friendly Office Products to Help Your Office Go Green

Today’s businesses understand that eco-friendly offices are a trend that bears paying attention to, and our friends at Clover Technology have provided you with 7 of the very best ideas for creating an environmentally conscious businesses.

7 Environmentally Friendly Office Products

Making an effort toward sustainability within your organization can increase your competitive edge and boost revenue — as well as productivity and company morale.

In fact, it’s been proven that workers perform better in offices that emphasize environmentally friendly upgrades. And that can do more than ramp up productivity — it can also help your organization attract the kind of workers that make a real difference to the level at which your enterprise operates.

Let’s look at some simple, but powerful, ways you can boost your office’s eco-friendly quotient.

7 Environmentally Friendly Office Products to Help Your Office Go Green

With more than 8.5 million tons of office furniture making its way to our overburdened landfills each year, it’s no wonder that the best, easiest, and most cost-effective way you can green up your office is to look closely at reuse and recycling.

Our selection of environmentally friendly office products centers on items that will help your office not only reduce or eliminate waste and reduce your carbon footprint, but help you reuse where it’s appropriate.

1. Eliminate Single-Use Water Bottles with a Water Delivery Service

With plastic debris accounting for anywhere from 60% to 80% of all marine pollution, it’s no wonder that single-use plastics are under fire. Four states – California, New York, Maine, and Vermont – have passed bans on them and cruise lines, hotels, and other businesses are following suit.

You can green up your office and make a difference by swapping out single-use water bottles with a water delivery service and encouraging your employees to bring in their own refillable bottles for use in the office.

Water services range from hot/cold fountains that are super-filtered at the source to water that’s delivered in reusable BPA-free bottles to be chilled on an as-needed basis — it’s up to your team to decide which better serves your office environment.

2. Reduce Environmental Impact with Remanufactured Printer Cartridges

According to statistics, more than 375 million OEM cartridges thrown away each year, further clogging already overburdened landfills. And, when you recognize that it takes a single one of these cartridges nearly a thousand years to completely decompose, you can understand what an enormous environmental burden they are to the health of our planet.

Additionally, these cartridges have been tagged as “potentially carcinogenic” and in landfills they have been found to leach toxic chemicals into the soil that can reach all the way to underground aquifers, polluting our precious water resources.

Each remanufactured cartridge that you buy can contribute to your overall level of corporate responsibility and commitment to sustainable practices. With each purchase, you’re keeping another cartridge out of our landfills and averting a significant chain of impacts to the environment.

3. Replace Light Fixtures with LED Bulbs

A quick fix for a greener workspace involves converting your incandescent lighting to LEDs to maximize your energy efficiency. Because LEDs are so small, they put off less heat into the environment, which can, in turn, help you keep your thermostat stable and in energy conservation mode.

The energy efficiency of these bulbs means they don’t have to be changed as frequently and, since they last five to ten years, they aren’t being thrown into landfills and adding to our solid waste problems.

And, today’s wide array of LED designs means you can find practically any type of bulb you need, even in specialty sizes.

4. Consider Document Management Software to Cut Down on Paper

The average office worker uses up to 10,000 sheets of paper every year, but 45% of the paper printed in offices ends up in the trash by day’s end. That’s what makes investing in document management software important in curtailing excessive use of paper.

Document management software can help reduce the amount of time employees spend looking for hard-copy documents, which can increase productivity and it can help prevent the catastrophic loss that sometimes occurs when paper-based records are damaged.

However, remember that some important documents will need to be printed in hard copy form, which brings us to our next product — refurbished printers.

5. Choose Refurbished Printers to Manage Your Carbon Footprint

Even if you choose document management software, you will always need to print certain critical documents, so to keep it green, consider pairing your remanufactured print cartridge with a refurbished printer for maximum impact.

Not only will you be conserving energy and resources by buying a refurbished unit, but you can realize savings of 10-25% over a new unit. And, high-quality refurbished printers will perform as well — or better — than new versions and come with a warranty to protect against premature failure.

6. Buy Recycled Paper, Tissues, Paper Towels

Since we’re talking about greener printing, don’t forget to source your copy and printer paper from companies that offer recycled papers.

Recycled paper produces 39% less solid waste using 31% of the energy it takes to create virgin fiber paper. In addition, it takes 53% less water to produce and uses no trees.

In fact, it’s estimated that if the magazine industry switched to using 100% recycled paper, it would be like removing 248,000 cars from the road – for a whole year!

7. Use Refillable Whiteboard Markers

Dry erase markers are a staple in most conference rooms, allowing staff to brainstorm, organize, and make assignments during meetings and events. However, it’s often hard to find one that works when you need it, as they tend to dry out quickly.
A great way to keep them out of the trash — and avoiding frequent spending on new ones – is to purchase a refillable set. They come in all colors and can be refilled easily, at a fraction of the price of new markers.

Other Ways to Go Green for Maximum Benefit

Offices looking to become more sustainable might consider some of the following options to increase their commitment to developing an environmentally friendly work space:

Use renewable energy sources such as solar or wind power

Lower energy usage by using natural light to illuminate office spaces

Reduce commuting impact by hiring remote workers or promoting walking, biking, or public transportation

Turn off the lights, heat or air conditioning, and electronics on weekends, during holidays, and every evening after work

Remember, making a transition to a more environmentally friendly office not only helps heal our planet, it provides concrete benefits for businesses in the form of cost savings, productivity, and competitiveness.

And, while we can’t guide you on implementing all of these changes, if you’re ready to discover how remanufactured cartridges from Clover can maximize your sustainability while saving you money, contact your

Jacobs Gardner representative at 1-800-638-0983 or email: customercare@jacobsgardner.com

www.jacobsgardner.com

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4 Tips to Make the Most of Your Home Office

4 Tips to Make the Most of Your Home Office

In these uncertain times, many of you are now finding yourself working from home. Our friends at Smead Manufacturing have shared these helpful tips on how you can create an enjoyable workspace at home.

Make-the-Most-of-Your-Home-Office

A home office is meant to be a place to work, whether you’re managing the business of life for you and your family or are lucky enough to have an employer who allows you the privilege to work from home. Creating the proper environment and spending your time wisely in your home office will save you time and stress.

1. Make It a Space You Enjoy – You probably spend a lot of time in your home office and you’ll want to create an environment that attracts you, versus repels you. Your space should be inviting as well as functional. Things for you to consider:

o Proper Lighting – Take advantage of natural lighting if you can. However, if you’re someone who prefers to work late in the evening, you’ll need good task lighting in order to lessen eye strain.

o Comfortable Chair – When you work from home, much of your time is spent sitting. Invest in a comfortable, ergonomic chair. You’ll feel better and your back will thank you in the long run.

o A Desk Tailored for You – What do you plan to do at your desk? If your work is primarily done on a computer and entails very little paper, a small desk will do you well. However, if you like to spread out with paper reports and reference material close by, you might choose a larger desk or an L-shaped one. If it’s more comfortable for you to stand and work, consider an adjustable desk.

2. Keep Clutter to a Minimum – It can be a challenge not to have piles on your desk. There’s always more work than you can keep up with, and mail and paperwork are part of that. To lessen the impact:

o Inbox – Ensure you have one place for paperwork and other items to land until you can deal with them, i.e. an inbox. Incoming items like meeting notes, business cards, and items to read should be placed in your inbox, rather than dumping them in a pile on your desk. Set a weekly appointment on your calendar to go through your inbox and process the items inside — add items to your to-do list or calendar, enter into your contacts, create a project file, put in a portable “to-read” folder, etc. Keep in mind your inbox is a holding spot that’s meant to be emptied. It’s not a file cabinet!

o The 2-Minute Pick Up – Before leaving your office, spend two minutes throwing away obvious trash (coffee cups, food containers, random sticky notes, etc.), putting supplies like pens and paper clips back in their drawer or container, and jot down notes about what you need to do the next day. Clearing your head is just as important as clearing your physical space.

o Schedule File Time – No one likes to file paper, but it won’t magically file itself either. Create a file system that is easy to use and easy to access so that you can find what you need when you need it. Then schedule regular intervals to file the paperwork you need to keep.

3. Have the Right Tools – Sometimes having the right tool is half the job. If your home office includes outdated technology that you constantly have to troubleshoot, you could be wasting a lot of time. Yes there is a monetary cost to keeping up with current devices, but you won’t have to deal with the time cost (in addition to the frustration from a slow computer or internet connection) when everything is working properly. Besides your basic computer and printer, other good tools to consider:

o Office Supplies – These should be within easy reach and you should have a supply on hand so you don’t have to head to the store or await a delivery when you run out of something. A well-supplied office contains: pens, pencils, sticky notes, paper clips, binder clips, a stapler, a tape dispenser, file folders, mailing supplies, etc.

o Label Maker – Keep it close by and as common place as your stapler. You can label files folders, containers, shelves, drawers and other areas for easy identification of where everything goes. Your 2-minute pick up will be a breeze!

o Scanner – If you’re aiming to have less paper in your office, a good quality scanner will help get you there.

4. Create Structure and Routine – There are so many distractions when working in a home office, it’s easy to lose focus. Set-up routines that work for you and your particular situation.

o Determine your office hours and stick to them.
o Process emails at scheduled times rather than letting them overtake your day.
o Allow for breaks in your day so you can refresh and recharge.
o Have a system for tracking tasks and projects. (Random notepads and sticky notes are not a system.)
o Know your priorities so you’re less overwhelmed and can put time and energy into what is important.

Follow these 4 simple steps and you will find your home office can be a productive and stress-free environment!
Lori Krolik


Lori Krolik is a professional organizer and productivity specialist and founder of More Time For You. For over 18 years she’s helped residential and small business clients create systems out of their most serious clutter challenges. Whether its piles that prevent a home from functioning the way it should or paper piles that impede office productivity, Lori brings the expertise and insight needed to create an organized system that is personalized to a client’s space and lifestyle. Lori became a Certified Productive Environment Specialist in 2010 and is a long time member of NAPO (National Association of Professional Organizers).

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